Environment 2011

  1. Air Quality Index ratings

    Air Quality Index (AQI) ratings:  The Air Quality Index (AQI) monitors concentrations of five major pollutants (carbon monoxide, fine particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide, ozone and sulphur dioxide) to determine whether the quality of air is Good, Fair, Poor, or Very Poor. Good is the best possible rating and means there...
  2. Number of smog advisories and days for each advisory

    The Ontario Ministry of Environment monitors air pollution levels and issues smog advisories when there is a strong likelihood that widespread elevated and persistent smog levels are expected. The number of smog advisory days is known to have a negative impact on breathing, especially for the elderly, young children and...
  3. Costs of dealing with garbage

    Costs of dealing with garbage: In 2009, it costs Niagara $67 to dispose of a tonne of garbage (the highest was $75 for Hamilton and only $19 for London). It costs $105 for Niagara to collect a tonne of residential garbage ($180 inHamilton, $85 inLondon, $79 inOttawa and $64 inBarrie)....
  4. Green space, agricultural lands and farming

    Green space … Niagara covers 1,854.17 square kilometres and has a population density of 230.5 persons per square kilometre. Ontario has a population density of 13.4 persons per square kilometres. Source: Statistics Canada, 2006, Community Profiles   Agricultural lands and farming:  Niagara has rich agricultural lands for growing tender fruits,...
  5. Introduction to the Environment in Niagara

      Our region’s iconic natural assets contribute to citizens’ enjoyment of their surroundings, as well as to Niagara’s economic, recreation, agriculture and tourism potential. Geography influences where and how we work, learn, live, travel and play. The quality of our air, water, land, wetlands and ecosystems supports life for both...
  6. Ecological footprint

    According to a 2004 report from the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM), Niagara’s ecological footprint is a little smaller than that of many of our neighbours. The report estimates the average Niagararesident needs about 6.88 hectares of land and water to sustain his or her lifestyle. Regions like Windsor, Waterloo,...
  7. Amount of water used in Niagara per capita and water quality

    Water is treated through Niagara Region treatment plants and it is reported to be safe to consume. It is recognized that it is more effective to protect our water from contaminants in the first place. We need fresh water in Niagara for drinking and household, agricultural, industrial and recreational uses....
  8. Number of boil water advisories

    In 2006, there were 2 community level Boil Water Advisories issued by Public Health; one in a portion of the Township of Wainfleet and the other issued for a limited area of Fort Erie (Niagara Watershed Report Card, 2006). Municipal water and sewer services do not exist in the Township...
  9. Ground level ozone levels in Niagara

    Data from 1990 to 2005 show an increasing trend in the ground-level ozone in both southern Ontario (which includes Niagara) and southern Quebec. These two regions had the highest concentrations and fastest increase of all regions monitored. In southern Ontario, home to over 30% of Canadians, the ozone exposure indicator...
  10. Pesticide Use

    As of June, 2007, Thorold was the only municipality in Niagara taking action against cosmetic pesticide use; a St. Catharines ban began in 2009. The province initiated a cosmetic pesticide ban in all parts of the province in April of 2010. Fines for individuals can be up to $20,000 and...
  11. Water quality monitoring and ratings for Niagara and the Great Lakes

    The Niagara Peninsula Conservation Authority (NPCA) implemented a water quality monitoring program in 2001 in partnership with the Ministry of the Environment, the Regional Municipality of Niagara and the City of Hamilton to track a range of indicators to examine the quality of our water sources and their tributaries across...
  12. Costs of treating and disposing of wastewater in Niagara

    Niagara costs of treating and disposing of wastewater are much more expensive at $429, compared to the $264 provincial OMBI average. It has remained higher since 2002 and the cost is now significantly above the provincial average. Table 3.1 Operating costs for waste water treatment and disposal per megalitre  ...
  13. Rates of sewer bypass in Niagara

    Rates of sewer bypass: The rate of sewer bypass in Niagara was 10 times higher than the provincial average in 2005 and more costly than the benchmark average of municipalities in Ontario. In Niagara, the percentage of wastewater estimated to have bypassed treatment went up as high as 3.42% in...
  14. Niagara’s wetlands and watersheds

    In 2005, wetlands covered an estimated 6.36% of the Niagara Watershed. It was estimated that 18.5% of the watershed was covered by natural areas, with a long-term target set for 30% to be covered. Source: Natural Peninsula Conservation; Watershed Report Card, 2007 “A watershed is an area of land over...
  15. Beach monitoring, postings for E. coli and swimming days lost

    Niagara Region Public Health uses the Beach Management Protocol to monitor beach sites alongLakeOntario, Lake Erie, the southern Niagara River and the public beach atDilsLake. They take samples and post closings when the E-coli bacteria levels are high and health could be affected. causing infections, especially for elderly, young children...