Housing & Shelter 2011

  1. Homelessness and the use of shelters in Niagara

    Homelessness:  Being homeless means one does not have a usual and safe place to call home and to return to at the end of the day. Homelessness could involve sleeping on the street, in a shelter or on a couch in another’s home. Table 5.4   OMBI reports 2006-2010 re social...
  2. Transitional housing initiatives

    Transitional housing initiatives:  In Niagara, there are upward of 167 beds available in emergency shelters.  Shelter beds use decreased by about 11% between 2008 and 2010. This decrease was attributed to a move in the Region to the use of additional temporary supportive housing initiatives and may not reflect a...
  3. New housing initiatives

    Six new projects:  In November of 2010, the Government of Canada and the Province of Ontario announced $15 million to fund six affordable housing projects for low-income seniors, low-income families and persons with disabilities in the Niagara Region (133 affordable housing units). Accessibility: Niagara Regional Housing (NRH) is overseeing an accessibility...
  4. Introduction to Housing and Shelter in Niagara

      Safe and affordable housing is fundamental for individuals and families striving to build a strong future for themselves and their communities. It provides the foundation families need to raise children and pursue education, jobs and wellness. To afford housing is to be able to afford rent or mortgage payments,...
  5. Variety of housing options in Niagara

    The new 2011 Census was conducted in May of 2011 and data will be forthcoming. In Niagara, there is a decline in the number of people between the ages of 25 to 44. That age group makes up 24.5 % of the total population today (26.5% in 2005). This age...
  6. Spending over 30% of income on housing in Niagara

    Affordability of housing, and spending over 30% of income on housing:  Affordable housing is defined as costing no more than 30 per cent of a household’s gross monthly income. Whether you pay rent or a mortgage, spending more than 30% of available income on housing creates financial difficulties. The proportion...
  7. Average Market Rent (AMR) for 2-bedroom in Niagara

    Average market rents:    The Average Market Rent (AMR) is calculated annually by Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC). AMR calculates the actual rents paid by tenants, factoring in rent supplements or housing allowance assistance. In theSt. Catharines– Niagara Census Metropolitan Area (CMA), in 2010, the overall average rent was...
  8. Vacancy rates in Niagara

    According to the CMHC, 2011 Spring Survey, in the St. Catharines– Niagara CMA, vacancy rates were 4.8% for April, 2010 and decreased to 3.6% in April, 2011. The availability rate was 7.3% in April, 2010 and 5.5% in April 2011.  A lower unemployment rate; modest employment gains; strong enrolment at...
  9. Housing Starts and the building industry

    Housing starts (including single, semi, row, apt) were up inNiagara in 2010 (1354) compared to 2009 (1015). Housing Starts declined for the first quarter of 2011 mainly due to the decline in row housing starts. Source:  http://www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/odpub/esub/64679/64679_2011_M01.pdf?fr=1308841467656 Housing Market Information http://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2011/schl-cmhc/nh12-35/NH12-35-2011-1-eng.pdf   Table 5.2 Housing data 2001-2010 in Niagara 2001...
  10. Purchase price of a home in Niagara

    The average price to purchase a single detached home in Niagara in 2010 was $217,938 ($213,032 so far in 2011). A full-time job, high earnings or two incomes makes ownership possible. Home ownership is beyond the annual incomes of many who live below the poverty line. Niagara’s home ownership rate...
  11. New Housing Price Index in Niagara

    The New Housing Price Index (NHPI) measures changes over time in contractors’ selling prices for new homes. The New Housing Price Index is recalculated with the NHPI equalling zero and up or down being measured again from that point (2007 was the year of recalculation). Table 5.3 2006 2007 2008...
  12. Core housing needs in Niagara

    The term acceptable housing refers to housing that is acceptable in condition, suitable in size, and affordable. Adequate housing does not require any major repairs according to residents. Suitable housing has enough bedrooms for the size and makeup of the residents. Affordable housing costs less than 30% of before tax...