Transportation & Mobility 2011

  1. Accident rates on major highways in Niagara

    Accident rates on major highways in Niagara:  The accident rate on the QEW rose to its highest level from 2002 to 2005, came down in 2006, and began to rise again in 2007, but not near the 2002-2005 levels. Figure 2.11   The main QEW accident section is as it...
  2. Introduction to Transportation and Mobility in Niagara

      Niagara’s assets can only be leveraged if transportation within municipalities, between municipalities and beyond the region’s borders is possible. It is important to be able to move from one place to another to work, learn, live, play, visit, volunteer, shop and access services. To have available and accessible modes...
  3. Use and availability of transportation to get to work

    Modes of transportation to get to work:  In Niagara, the automobile continues to be the predominant mode of travel to work with 89.9% of the population identifying they used the car as their primary mode of travel to work, either as a passenger or driver in 2006. This number was...
  4. Commuting and distances to work

    Commuting and distances to work: The median commuting distance Niagara residents reported to get to work was 5.9 km. in 2006 (7.6 km. for Canada). 44.0% of the population were less than 5 km from work; 29.0% were 5-14 km from work; and 3.8% were 15-24 km from work. Commuting...
  5. Rail, land, air and water transportation available in Niagara

    Rail, land, air and water transportation available in Niagara: Via Rail trains connect twice a day between Niagara Falls and St. Catharines with connections to Toronto, Hamilton and on to other parts of Ontario and Canada. They go south to the United States at Niagara Falls and link with Amtrak....
  6. Use of buses and public transportation

    According to the General Social Survey (GSS), only 2.8%, in 2008 of those in Niagara reported taking public transit to work (2.5% in 2006). Buses are used for work, school, recreation, health appointments and education purposes. Bus transit routes and services operate within each municipality. There are a total of...
  7. Use of the Niagara Specialized Transit (NST)

    The Niagara Specialized Transit service was operationalized in 2007. This specialized transit is used mostly for medical reasons (particularly dialysis), but its use for education and work is increasing. Users are often accompanied by their assistive devices and wheelchairs. Figure 2.4 Figure 2.5   Data on the use of NST...
  8. Annual costs and affordability of transportation

    In 2009, Ontario households reported spending an average of $9,753 a year on transportation costs (private and public costs). Those below the poverty line often cannot afford car transportation. Source: http://www40.statcan.ca/cst01/famil16d-eng.htm CANSIM Table From 2001 to 2009 in St. Catharines- Niagara CMA, the cost of a monthly transit pass as...
  9. Paved and unpaved roads in Niagara

    The condition of the roads, their maintenance and congestion are of relevance to the quality of life and work in Niagara, since the automobile is the main mode of transportation. Our roads carry people, goods and services across the region. Niagara Region maintains 1,674 lane kilometres of paved roads and...
  10. Volume of traffic on Niagara roads

    The volume of traffic onNiagararoads is measured by the number of times (in thousands) that a vehicle travels over each lane kilometre of road. The figure gives an indication of the municipality’s road congestion.Niagara’s volume of traffic was 1, 248 in 2007, 1, 255 in 2009 and rose to 1,403...
  11. Busy transportation routes and congestion

    Busy transportation routes in Niagara:  International border crossings from the US (inbound), January to March 2011 were 1,654,973 (607,607 for March) – down 5.9% from the previous period. International border crossings to the US (outbound) January to March, 2011 were 6,763,519 – up 8.5% from the previous year. The Queen...