Work & Employment 2011

  1. Not for profit and unpaid work

    Not-for-profit sector The not-for-profit sector is a significant employer in Ontario comprising 7.5% of Ontario’s workforce, with an estimated 597,000 employees (excluding hospitals, colleges and universities; NSNVO, 2003). The sector employs more paid workers than the finance and insurance sector or the construction industry. According to NSNVO, 60% of Ontario...
  2. Employment services in Niagara

    Employment Services:  There are several “for profit” and government-funded employment service organizations in Niagara. Organizations that are funded by the Ministry of Training Colleges and Universities (MTCU) are part of Employment Ontario.   There are nine organizations in Niagara that are part of Employment Ontario.  Each organization offers a one-stop approach...
  3. Introduction to Work and Employment in Niagara

      Having quality opportunities to work, contribute and earn a living wage is important to the health and wellbeing of a family, an individual and a community. The sustainability of a community is reliant on the employment of its citizens and the utilization of their talents and human capital in...
  4. Regional coordinating and planning

    Regional coordination and planning:  The Niagara Workforce Planning Board (NWPB) is the regional collaborating organization that leads “in the creation of innovative labour market solutions by bringing people together” (NWPB Mission Statement).  Several reports and research studies with more information are available at niagaraworkforceboard.ca.  The NWPB’s most recent report –...
  5. Employment rates in Niagara

    Labour Force characteristics for St. Catharines – Niagara CMA, for population over 15 years of age (based on a monthly moving average). Source: Statistics Canada Table 28200090 Table 282-0001, Catalogue No. 71-001-41E. From 1999 to 2009, employment increased 4.75% in Niagara, lower than the 12% increase that had been predicted...
  6. Employment growth in Niagara

    The St.Catharines – Niagara CMA was well below Ontario’s bigger growth performers by far; Kichener, Sudbury and Toronto were leaders. However, Hamilton, Windsor, Ottawa, Thunder Bay,  London, and Kingston had participation rates below our CMA. Yearly employment percentage by CMA in the first quarter of 2011: Source: CIBC Metropolitan Economic...
  7. Unemployment rates in Niagara

    The unemployment rate:  Niagara’s unemployment rate in May of 2011 was 9.2%, higher than 8.3% for Ontario and 7.2% for June, 2011 for Canada. The 2009/2010 unemployment rate was 9.2% in Niagara (8.7% in Ontario; 8.0% in Canada).  Unemployment for youth 15-24 years of age was 17% (17.2% in Ontario;...
  8. Employment for specific groups in Niagara

    Employment for specific groups in Niagara:  In Niagara, as in the rest of Canada, employment opportunities and earnings are different and more challenging for women, immigrants, Aboriginal peoples and people with physical or mental disabilities. Immigrants:  The unemployment rate of Niagara’s most recent immigrants is 12%, close to double the...
  9. Shifts in the main employment sectors in Niagara

    Shifts in the main sectors of employment in Niagara as reported by numbers employed …. In Niagara, in 2010, the majority of the jobs were in the retail and wholesale trade sector (17%), accommodations and food service sector (12%), and the manufacturing sector (11%), accounting for 40% of the employment....
  10. Largest employers in the Niagara Region

    Larger employers:  Niagara’s larger employers are no longer predominantly in manufacturing, but in hotels and tourism, education, health and municipal government. Niagara, similar to other communities that previously had a significant reliance on employment centred on a few dominant manufacturers, is experiencing the emergence of companies employing smaller workforces and...
  11. Employment sectors & revenue generated

    Major employment sectors by revenue generated:  Despite the large number of jobs lost in manufacturing, this sector still generated the most revenue– over 7 billion dollars in revenue in 2008. Wholesale and retail trade, as well as construction, and accommodation and food services are also important major contributors to the...
  12. Workplace Injuries

    Injuries in the workplace data for Niagara:  Workplace injuries affect the employee and the employer in very significant ways with days and productivity lost as well as costs incurred. In 2010, employers based in Niagara accounted for approximately 2-3% of Total Injuries (TI) (Schedule 1 & 2) When comparing 2010...
  13. Places where people do their work and commute to work

    Commuting to work:  Location of talented workers, in relation to available job opportunities, is an important factor in our region’s employment profile.  Forty-seven per cent of Niagara’s workers travel outside their municipalities, but still work within the region and commute less than 20 km to work. Thirty percent of Niagara’s...