Jobs in Niagara

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Average income

The following graph shows 2010 median and average income for the St. Catharines-Niagara CMA (census metropolitan area).

Note: the St. Catharines-Niagara CMA does not include Grimsby and West Niagara.

average income

Source: Niagara Workforce Planning Board, based on Statistics Canada, 2011 National Household Survey
Retrieved From: http://www.niagaraworkforce.ca/?tag=incomes-in-niagara

Employment and Unemployment Rates

Labour Force Characteristics, St. Catharines-Niagara CMA (census Metropolitan area)
Note: the St. Catharines-Niagara CMA does not include Grimsby and West Niagara.

October 2014

Seasonally Unadjusted

St. Catharines-Niagara CMA

Ontario

Unemployment Rate

6.2%

7.0%

Employment Rate

 57.8%

  61.5%

Participation Rate

61.6%

  66.2%

Seasonally Adjusted

St. Catharines-Niagara CMA

   Ontario

Unemployment Rate

6.9%

7.0%

Employment Rate

 57.0%

  61.2%

Participation Rate

61.3%

  65.9%

Note: Population 15 and over. Seasonally Unadjusted and Adjusted, by census metropolitan area (3 month moving average) and by Province (Monthly)
Source: Statistics Canada, CANSIM, table 282-0116, and Catalogue no. 71-001-XIE
Last modified: 2014-11-07

Source: Niagara Workforce Planning Board
Retrieved From: http://www.niagaraworkforceboard.ca/index2.php?lang=1

Labour Force Survey data for Hamilton-Niagara Peninsula Economic Region
Ontario Monthly Labour Force Statistics, by Economic Region, Sept. 2013

3-Month Moving Averages
Seasonally Unadjusted Data

Employment

Unemployment Rate

August
2013
(‘000)

August
2012
(‘000)

Yearly
Variation
(%)

August
2013
(%)

August
2012
(%)

Yearly
Variation
(% points)

Ontario

6,990.2

6,869.0

1.8%

7.9%

8.3%

-0.4

Ottawa

691.8

701.5

-1.4%

7.2%

6.5%

0.7

Hamilton-Niagara Peninsula

705.1

724.6

-2.7%

7.4%

7.9%

-0.5

Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.
Source: Statistics Canada, Labour Force Survey – CANSIM Table 282-0054
http://www.esdc.gc.ca/eng/jobs/lmi/publications/bulletins/on/sep2013.shtml

Unemployment Rates: Unemployment rates in Niagara declined overall between 2010 and 2014. They increased slightly in 2012 but declined again in late 2013 and early 2014.

Source: CIBC World Markets (CIBCWM) Metropolitan Economic Activity Index
Retrieved From: http://srv129.services.gc.ca/rbin/eng/niagara.aspx?rates=1CIBC Metropolitan Economic Activity Index 2011

Employment Sectors in Niagara

The Niagara Workforce Planning Board provides a breakdown of Niagara employment in different sectors and industries in the following “Table 1” from the 2013 Labour Market Update report

niagara employment by sector and industry

Source: Labour Market Update Report (October 2013), NWPB
Retrieved From: http://www.niagaraworkforce.ca/?p=83

According to the Niagara Region Economic Growth Strategy 2013-2015 report, there are 984 manufacturing companies, primarily small and medium-sized businesses in Niagara that employ 21,200 individuals. Manufacturing is still a relevant labour sector and workforce income generator in Niagara. Despite its shift from a few traditional large scale manufacturers to many smaller-scale operations, the sector employs significant numbers.

The report also states that the largest employer in Niagara is still the Services-producing sector, employing 78.2% of labor (dominated by trade which employs 16.5%). The Goods-producing sector saw a slight employment uptick in 2013, with 2,600 new workers, representing an increase of 6.5% over 2012.

Source: Niagara Region Economic Development
Retrieved From: http://www.niagaracanada.com/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=gIeEjznxQR8=&tabid=294

Workforce Composition by Sector in Niagara for 2012 and 2013
According to the 2013 Niagara Workforce Planning Board October 2013 Labour Market Update report, after increasing to 13,700 jobs in 2011-2012, the construction sector in Niagara fell back to 12,600 jobs in 2013, a level that is consistent with 2009-2010 figures. The manufacturing sector recovered somewhat from its 2012 low of 20,800 workers and in 2013 stood at 23,000, which is still at a lower point than at any time prior to 2009. This is attributable to a rather gradual economic recovery underway as a result of the 2008 recession.

workforce composition by sector in niagara

Source: Statistics Canada, Labour Force Survey estimates 2013, cited in Labour Market Update Report, October 2013 by NWPB
Retrieved From: http://www.niagaraworkforce.ca/?p=83

Gender and employment in Niagara
In 2012 the majority of workers in Niagara were employed full-time, with men holding 25% more of these full time positions than women. Related to this, a higher percentage of part-time positions were filled by women than by men.

niagara labour force distribution by sex

Source: Niagara Workforce Planning Board (NWPB)
Retrieved From: http://www.niagaraworkforce.ca/?p=83

Niagara Employment in Key Public Industries: There is a consistent trend of people having employment in health care services in Niagara. This trend saw a slight drop in 2013, but health care services remains the leading source of employment compared to other key public sectors of educational services and public administration.

niagara employment in key public industries

Source: Niagara Workforce Planning Board (NWPB)
Retrieved From: http://www.niagaraworkforce.ca/?p=83

For-Social-Profit* and Unpaid Work

*The emerging term “For Social Profit” is traditionally referred to as “Not-for-Profit”. An increasing number of organizations are choosing to reflect their role of strengthening community socio-economic conditions by redefining from non-profit to the positive for-social-profit term.

“The term social-profit organization can better capture the contributions made by groups that have traditionally been known as non-profit organizations. Social-profit focuses more on the investment and societal benefit that have always characterized organizations that serve the social good.

It also gives us a new way to name the people and groups that support us and promote social good as social investors. Today’s social investors seek a return on their efforts, in the form of an increase in the greater good.”

Source: Sexual Assault Support Centre of Waterloo Region
Retrieved From: http://www.sascwr.org/Social-Profit

The Ontario Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration released a profile of Ontario Not-for-Profit and Charitable organizations in 2013.
This report shows that 87% of not-for-profit organizations in Ontario involve volunteers. The average number of volunteer hours/year is 345. These volunteers contribute over 8 Million hours, or over 274,000 full-time equivalents (FTEs).

Organizations report that about one-in-ten volunteers contribute more than once a week; one-in-four organizations report their volunteers only contribute once or twice a year.

Volunteers with Religious or Health-oriented organizations contribute most frequently (38% and 37% of volunteers gave time at least once each week, respectively), while environmental groups reported the lowest frequency of contribution (nearly half of volunteers contribute once or twice a year).

Source: State of the Sector: Profile of Ontario Not-for-Profit and Charitable Organizations, Volume 1: Overall Report, September 19, 2013, (Pollara Research) Ontario Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration
Retrieved From: http://www.citizenship.gov.on.ca/english/pp/docs/state_of_the_sector_overall_report_volume1.pdf

Places where people do their work and commute to work

Commuting to Work:

Median commuting duration data for the St. Catharines-Niagara CMA (census metropolitan area), which does not include Grimsby and West Lincoln, was gathered from the 2011 Statistics Canada National Household Survey (NHS).

Median commuting duration refers to how many minutes it took for a person to travel from home to work, with the Median being the value which divides the commuting duration into two equal halves, i.e., the commuting duration of individuals for the first half is below the median, while the commuting distance of individuals for the second half is above the median.

Time Leaving for Work refers to how many minutes it took for a person to travel from home to work. Median commuting duration is the value which divides the commuting duration into two equal halves, i.e., the commuting duration of individuals for the first half is below the median, while the commuting distance of individuals for the second half is above the median.

Median commuting duration                           

Total                                 

Male

Female

Total employed population aged 15 years and over with a usual place of work or no fixed workplace address by median commuting duration

170,375

87,585

82,795

Median commuting duration (minutes)

15.7

16.0

15.4

Time leaving for work

Total employed population aged 15 years and over by time leaving for work

170,380

87,585

82,790

Between 5 and 6:59 a.m.

39,760

27,465

12,295

Between 7 and 9:00 a.m.

89,760

40,650

49,110

Anytime after 9:00 a.m.

40,855

19,465

21,390

Statistics Canada. 2013. St. Catharines – Niagara, CMA, Ontario (Code 539) (table). National Household Survey (NHS) Profile. 2011 National Household Survey. Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 99-004-XWE. Ottawa. Released September 11, 2013.
Note: St. Catharines-Niagara CMA (census metropolitan area) does not include Grimsby and West Lincoln.

Source: Statistics Canada
Retrieved From: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/dp-pd/prof/index.cfm?Lang=E

Commuting Flow by Census Subdivisions
The NWPB has summarized Statistics Canada data from the 2006 National Household Survey (NHS), broken down by the number of male and female commuters to and from the local municipalities within Niagara

Source: NWPB
Retrieved From: http://niagaraworkforceboard.ca/userfiles/file/Niagara%20Community%20Profile%20Data/Commuting_Patterns_Niagara.pdf

Youth Employment and Unemployment Rates

In 2011, 17% of people aged 15 to 24 in Niagara were unemployed, nearly 2% higher than the provincial average, according to a report from First Work (Ontario Association of Youth Employment Centres, 2012).

Source: First Work OAYEC (2012) Summer Stats Update: Labour Force Characteristics by Census Metropolitan Areas for Youth (15 to 24 years) in Ontario
Retrieved From: http://www.firstwork.org/wp/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/Summer-Statistics-Update-2012.pdf

The following two reports contain data and analysis about Youth Unemployment in Ontario and Canada:

Young and Jobless (2013)
Source: Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
Retrieved From: https://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/Ontario%20Office/2013/09/Young_and_jobless_final3.pdf

#Generation Flux: Understanding the Seismic Shifts that are Shaking Canada’s Youth (2012)
Source: Community Foundations of Canada
Retrieved From: http://niagaraknowledgeexchange.com/resources/generation-flux-understanding-the-seismic-shifts-that-are-shaking-canadas-youth/

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